Jaime Wyatt

Saturday, January 28, 2023 @ 7:00 PM (Pacific)
  • Museum Members receive a 10% ticket discount

Event Details

Join us for an evening of music with singer/songwriter/guitarist Jaime Wyatt.

JAIME WYATT

If Wyatt sounds defiant, well, there’s a reason for that. Her life story is specked with difficult—and unusual—twists and turns. She is an immensely talented and insightful singer-songwriter who signed to her first record label as a teenager, achieving early success before losing that deal and being put through the music-industry wringer; a country music devotee who ever since has been honing her craft in bars and clubs, late night after late night and long year after long year; and a hard-luck, hard-living artist whose outlaw tales—including a battle with an insidious drug addiction and incarceration—are more than mere lyrical fodder for a woe-is-me honky-tonk tune.

As might be expected from someone with such a turbulent backstory, even the challenges faced by Wyatt as a woman working in country music come with an extra wrinkle: Wyatt confronted some hard truths about her life and past romantic relationships, which resulted in her coming out as a gay woman to family and friends. 

For Wyatt, a self-described introvert, this is very much a personal issue. “I'm not, like, on the internet with flying rainbows,” she quips. But at the same time, she says, “I’m also basically coming out to the world with [my newest] record.” This is particularly evident on “Rattlesnake Girl,” where Wyatt sings, “I see my sweet friends out on the weekends, they all look happy and gay / They keep their secrets all covered in sequins, people have too much to say.” And for anyone who might have a problem with that? Well, there’s also a line in the song about what Wyatt might do with her boot heel…

Addressing the lyrics of the song, Wyatt says, “My experience with recovery made me realize I lost years of my life being in the closet and living a lie and trying to be someone else. I just can't do it anymore. And yeah, I'm scared there are people that like country music that aren't gonna like that I'm gay. But like I said earlier, ultimately I'm going to die if I can’t be who I am.”

Wyatt, who was born in Los Angeles, grew up “in the middle of the woods” in the Pacific Northwest and currently resides in Nashville, has never been overly concerned with fitting in anyway. “I mean, honestly, I don't feel like I fit in anywhere,” she says. “But that’s fine—I wouldn't want to get too comfortable. Because as an artist, being unique is my greatest asset. So if I were to fall into a scene, I probably wouldn’t push myself to really make something that is captivating.”

At the end of the day, she continues, “I’m just a songwriter, and I spend a good portion of my life in barrooms performing and worshipping country music and rock ‘n’ roll and telling my story. And I do it because I believe in the power of music, and I believe that music has saved my life in so many ways,” Wyatt says. “And that belief is a powerful thing.” 

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This event is part of The Prebys Performance Series: Live Music in an Intimate Setting.  The Prebys Performance Series has been made possible in part by The Conrad Prebys Foundation.

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Booked in association with Belly Up Entertainment

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